10 Plants That Start With J

African Violets

A diverse array of plants, including the resilient Jade plant, the ornamental Japanese maple, and the decorative Jerusalem cherry, alongside the fragrant Jasmine and the evergreen Juniper. Also, the unique Jack-in-the-pulpit, the vibrant Japanese quince, the delicate Japanese anemone, the alluring Jewel orchid, and the colorful Joseph’s coat.

houseplants

Houseplants Starting With

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVW – X – YZ

Japanese Cress

Also known as Chinese Ivy or Cardamine lyrata, it is a species of aquatic plant in the mustard family. It is native to the marshes of eastern China and Siberia, as well as Korea and Japan. It flowers from May to June in the wild, with seeds ripening through September. The species is cultivated as an aquarium ornamental. It needs a supply of cool, slow-moving water and strong light.

Also, read the article 8 plants start with q

It can grow rapidly under the right conditions and makes an attractive, bushy plant. It can be grown in ponds as long as the water temperature does not exceed about 82°F (28°C). It propagates easily by cuttings and high levels of carbon dioxide speed growth.

Japanese Cress

Java Glory Vine

Known as Clerodendrum x speciosum, it is a non-hardy vine that produces red and scarlet blooms that are attractive to butterflies. The vine peaks in mid-winter and then sporadically throughout the year. It should be planted in bright light to full sun, moisture retentive well-drained soils, and provided with a trellis or other means of support for it to clamber up on.

Java Glory Vine

Jamaican Ebony

Also known as Brya Ebenus, it is a species of flowering tree in the pea family, Fabaceae, that is native to the Caribbean islands of Cuba and Jamaica. It is also known as espino de sabana, granadillo, cocus wood, cocuswood, and coccuswood. Horticulturally it is known as the Jamaican rain tree. The Jamaican rain tree is a small drought-resistant tree that can grow around 20–30 feet tall and produces long, drooping branches. It has small, waxy 2-3 parted compound leaves that often appear to be simple.

Also, read the article 10 plants that start with u

The bright yellow flowers develop on short indeterminate (racemose) inflorescences. They are typically pea-like and hermaphroditic, with bilateral symmetry and heterostyly. The fruits are legumes, which are common for the family Fabaceae. Brya ebenus grows in scrublands (tropical terrestrial biome), needs full sunlight and flowers sporadically throughout the year.

Jamaican Ebony

Japanese Camellia

Known as Camellia Japonica, it is an evergreen shrub that typically grows to 6-12’ tall on stems clad with oval, leathery, glossy, dark green leaves (3-4” long) with finely serrated margins. It is native to China and Japan. The beautiful clusters of blooms usually appear in late winter and stay through the spring. They come in various colors and bring a plethora of pollinators to your garden.

They are winter hardy to USDA zones 7 to 9, withstanding temperatures down to 10 degrees Fahrenheit, but they do not fare well during extreme temperature fluctuations. Japanese camellias do not need full sun, preferring a light shade. They can grow in full sun, but they would benefit from protection from intense sun rays during scorching, sunny days.

Japanese Camellia

Jeruju

Also known as Acanthus Ilicifolius, it is a shrub from the Acanthus family. This plant is native to Australia, Australasia, and Southeast Asia. The Jeruju plant is used in traditional medicine. The leaves, seeds, and roots are used as vermifuge. The whole plant is used to treat kidney stones. A decoction of the plant is used in dyspepsia. It also has anti-inflammatory properties.

The methanolic fraction of A. ilicifolius leaf extract produced significant inhibition of rat paw edema when administered both prior to and after carrageenan administration. The extract decreased protein exudation and leukocyte migration in the peritoneal fluid, thereby indicating its effectiveness towards inhibiting peritoneal inflammation.

Jeruju

Japanese bird’s-nest fern

Scientifically known as Asplenium nidus, it is a highly sought-after houseplant that hails from the tropical regions of Asia and the Pacific. Its unique appearance is characterized by long, wavy fronds that resemble a bird’s nest, hence its moniker.

This fern prefers bright, indirect sunlight, which makes it an ideal plant for indoor spaces. However, direct sunlight can scorch the leaves, so it’s best to place the plant near a window that receives filtered light or in a room with bright, indirect light. It’s important to note that the Japanese Bird’s Nest Fern can tolerate low light conditions, which makes it a great option for rooms with less natural light.

Japanese bird’s-nest fern

Jack Oak

Also known as Blackjack Oak, it is a medium-sized oak tree native to New York to the Texas panhandle. Unlike its other grandiose cousins, the blackjack oak is often an understory tree that grows in the shadow of taller oaks such as the post, scarlet and red oak. These trees might be taller, but the amazing thing about a blackjack oak is that it can stand out on its own in areas where soil quality is poor.

In these locations, the blackjack is the king, and this is where it can claim its niche in a garden or landscape design. If a space contains particularly poor soil, especially sandy, rocky, dry, or close enough to the coast to suffer from high salt levels, selecting the blackjack oak for the spot might make sense. While it might not reach 100 feet, it can still be an unmanageable space for a small area, reaching heights of 50 feet or so at times.

Jack Oak

Jamaica Dogwood

Known as Piscidia piscipula, it is a tropical tree that’s found in Florida, the West Indies, and throughout Central America. This tree has a long history of use in traditional medicine and has been used for treating nerve pain, migraine, sleeplessness, anxiety, and nervous tension.

The native Taino of the West Indies discovered that extracts from the tree could sedate fish, allowing them to be caught by hand. This practice led to the tree’s common names—fishpoison and fishfuddle. The tree has medicinal value as an analgesic and sedative.

Jamaica Dogwood

Juniper

Junipers are coniferous trees and shrubs in the genus Juniperus of the cypress family Cupressaceae. They are widely distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere, from the Arctic, south to tropical Africa, throughout parts of western, central and southern Asia, east to eastern Tibet in the Old World, and in the mountains of Central America.

Junipers vary in size and shape from tall trees, 20–40 metres (66–131 feet) tall, to columnar or low-spreading shrubs with long, trailing branches. They are evergreen with needle-like and/or scale-like leaves. The female seed cones are very distinctive, with fleshy, fruit-like coalescing scales which fuse together to form a berrylike structure.

Juniper

Japanese Cedar

Japanese cedar, also commonly known as suji or by its botanical name Cryptomeria, is an evergreen conifer and national tree of Japan. It is called a cedar but is a cypress tree. It grows upright, with a straight trunk, and is prized for its pinkish, aromatic timber.

It grows best in full sun, requiring about six hours of sunlight and moist, rich, acidic soil, and can handle below-freezing winters and mild heat. The tree will thrive and perform its best in full sun. While it prefers rich, acidic, consistently moist but well-drained soil.

Japanese Cedar

About Christopher Evans

Hello, I'm Chris, the green-thumbed Founder of PotGardener.com. I'm passionate about bringing the beauty of nature indoors through houseplants and indoor gardening. Let's create healthier and more beautiful living spaces, one plant at a time!

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