10 Plants That Look Like Hair

Foxtail Fern (5)

Plants that resemble hair can be a unique and interesting addition to your garden or indoor plant collection. These plants not only add a touch of whimsy to your garden or home but also offer a unique and fascinating visual appeal with their hair-like foliage. Here are ten plants with foliage that can be reminiscent of hair:

String of Pearls

This succulent plant features long, trailing stems adorned with small, spherical leaves that resemble pearls on a string. The String of Pearls plant, also known as Curio rowleyanus (formerly Senecio rowleyanus), is a unique vining succulent that is easily recognizable by its tiny pea-shaped leaves.
It is typically cultivated globally year-round as a hanging plant.
In its East African natural desert habitat, a string of pearl plants are terrestrial and form a ground cover.
The plant produces white flowers in spring with a pleasant cinnamon-like scent; although, it rarely flowers indoors.


This plant is toxic to humans and pets. Given enough light and fertilizer, it will grow quite vigorously in a season. A single plant will survive for about five years if properly cared for, but if you propagate new plants from stem cuttings, you can effectively keep it alive indefinitely.

String of Pearls

String of Hearts

Also known as the “Chain of Hearts,” it has delicate, heart-shaped leaves that dangle gracefully from cascading stems. The String of Hearts plant (Ceropegia woodii) is a unique and attractive houseplant with evergreen, succulent, trailing vines that look good in hanging baskets or pots on shelves or window sills. The heart-shaped, fleshy, gray-green foliage has an eye-catching marbled pattern, and the thin, string-like vines have a distinctive purple shade.

It goes dormant in cooler weather, slowing down its growth.
With the right warm conditions, moisture levels, and filtered light, the string of hearts plant is fast-growing and will flower abundantly.It is known for being robust and is a good plant for inexperienced houseplant growers, as it can cope with periods of neglect relatively well.

String of Hearts

Spider Plant

The long, arching leaves of the spider plant can resemble hair as they grow in a cascade, making it a popular choice for hanging baskets. The Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum) is among the most popular and easiest to grow of all houseplants.
It grows rosettes of slender, gently arching leaves that can stretch from around 12 to 18 inches long.
The leaves can be green or striped green and white. Mature plants regularly send out long stems that bear small, star-shaped flowers.
If the flowers are fertilized, a small fruit forms. Once the flowers fall off, tiny plantlets form in their place, which ultimately grow their roots and can be snipped off to create new potted plants.

Spider Plant

Bleeding Heart Vine

This climbing vine has striking red or pink flowers that resemble a bleeding heart, and its foliage can hang like hair. The Bleeding Heart Vine (Clerodendrum thomsoniae), also known as Glory Bower, is a tender, fast-growing tropical climbing vine.
It produces big clusters of showy flowers and has glossy, dark-green, oval leaves.
It is best planted in the spring and flowers during the summer for new growth. This vine is a well-behaved, non-aggressive plant that reaches lengths of about 15 feet (4.5 m.) at maturity.
You can train Clerodendrum bleeding heart vines to twine around a trellis or other support, or you can let the vines sprawl freely over the ground.

Bleeding Heart Vine

Lipstick Plant

The dark green leaves and vibrant red tubular flowers of this plant can create a cascading effect, resembling the flow of hair. The Lipstick plant is a popular, striking tropical evergreen perennial, often grown as a houseplant.
It gets its name from its vibrant red tubular flowers.
In its native tropical habitat, this is an epiphytic species found growing from tree branches and in cracks in rocks. As a houseplant, it should be planted in a well-draining potting mix.
If the plant gets enough warmth, humidity, and filtered sunlight, you’ll enjoy a prolific display of flowering through much of the year with the most abundant show in the summer and fall.

Lipstick Plant

Muhly Grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris)

Muhly Grass (Muhlenbergia capillaris) is a stunning ornamental grass known for its delicate, feathery pink to purple flower plumes that appear in late summer to early fall. Native to the southeastern United States, this grass is a popular choice for adding color and texture to landscapes and gardens. It typically grows in clumps and reaches a height of 3 to 4 feet, with a spread of 2 to 3 feet.

Muhly Grass is relatively low-maintenance and thrives in full sun and well-drained soil. It is drought-tolerant once established and attracts birds and butterflies, making it a great addition to wildlife gardens. The airy, cloud-like appearance of its flowers adds a sense of movement and ethereal beauty to garden borders, meadows, and mass plantings. Muhly Grass is also suitable for coastal gardens due to its salt tolerance. Overall, it’s a versatile and visually striking grass that brings a touch of elegance to outdoor spaces.

 Muhly Grass

Maidenhair Fern

The delicate, fan-like fronds of maidenhair ferns give them a wispy, hair-like appearance. The Maidenhair Fern (Adiantum raddianum) is a deciduous fern known for its delicate, fan-shaped leaf segments clustered on wiry black stems.
It’s a popular houseplant for its attractive foliage and compact size.
As houseplants, maidenhair ferns prefer indirect or dappled light, warm, humid conditions, and moist, well-drained soil.
They are considered slow-growing ferns, typically taking up to three years to reach their mature size.
The plant is native to the tropical Americas and West Indies.
Note that some species of maidenhair fern are considered invasive in some parts of the United States.

Maidenhair Fern

Foxtail Fern

The Foxtail Fern, scientifically known as Asparagus densiflorus ‘Meyersii’, is a popular ornamental plant valued for its unique, fluffy appearance and easy care. Unlike true ferns, it is a member of the asparagus family and is native to South Africa. The plant features plume-like, bright green foliage that resembles a fox’s tail, hence its common name.

This fern is well-suited for both indoor and outdoor cultivation, thriving in partial shade to full shade and well-draining soil. It is often used in hanging baskets, container gardens, or as ground cover in shaded areas. The Foxtail Fern is drought-tolerant once established and requires minimal maintenance, making it a favorite among gardeners and landscapers. Also, here is a detailed article on how to propagate Foxtail Fern

In addition to its ornamental appeal, the plant is non-toxic to pets, making it a safe choice for households with animals. With its graceful, arching stems and soft, needle-like leaves, the Foxtail Fern adds a touch of elegance and lushness to any garden or living space. Also, here is a detailed article on how to care for Foxtail Fern

Foxtail Fern

Creeping Jenny

This ground cover plant features vibrant yellow-green leaves that can spread and cascade like a curtain of hair. Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia) is a perennial with bright, small yellow flowers.
This low-growing “creeper” is best grown for its foliage, which makes an excellent ground cover.
It’s a member of the family Primulaceae and is hardy in United States Department of Agriculture zones.
Creeping Jenny spreads naturally with arrowhead-shaped lime-green to medium-green leaves and trumpet-shaped small yellow flowers in spring or summer.
It’s often thought of as a nuisance in the yard because of how well it spreads.
However, it’s also a lovely ornamental plant that can add color and soften hard edges wherever it’s planted.

Creeping Jenny

Rhipsalis

These epiphytic cacti have long, slender stems that drape down, resembling hanging locks of hair. Rhipsalis, also commonly known as the mistletoe or coral cactus, is a tropical lithophytic (growing on rocks) or epiphytic (growing on trees) cactus without spines that has long, thin draping, cascading stems. It’s a genus of epiphytic flowering plants in the cactus family, typically known as mistletoe cacti.

They are found in parts of Central America, the Caribbean, and northern regions of South America. They also inhabit isolated locations in Africa and Asia and are the only cactus group naturally occurring in the Old World.

Rhipsalis is a low-maintenance hanging house plant that’s perfect for beginners. Although it has no prickles, it’s a cactus, also known as the mistletoe cactus. This may be because the tiny white flowers that appear along its stems through winter into spring are followed by small white or pale pink berries or because its spineless foliage looks a little like mistletoe. The long stems of this tropical plant make it a good choice for adding greenery to a shelf or mantlepiece.

In terms of care, Rhipsalis grows best indoors in indirect, filtered light conditions with acidic soil. It’s an easy plant to look after. Hang it up or place it on a shelf in a bright spot out of direct sunlight. Its long stems can reach several meters in length and it has small flowers, often through the winter, but occasionally year-round.

In terms of watering, although Rhipsalis is a cactus, it’s native to South American rainforests and needs more watering than a regular cactus. How much you water depends on its position. In a shady spot, keep the compost fairly dry. In a position where the plant gets sunlight, water until the water runs out of the bottom of the pot, and then don’t water again until the top few inches of compost dries out.

Rhipsalis

About Christopher Evans

Hello, I'm Chris, the green-thumbed Founder of PotGardener.com. I'm passionate about bringing the beauty of nature indoors through houseplants and indoor gardening. Let's create healthier and more beautiful living spaces, one plant at a time!

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