10 Plants Start With V

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This list comprises diverse plant species, including Vaccinium (blueberries), Valerian (herbal remedy), Variegated Indian Holly Fern, Vanda and Vanilla Bean Orchids, Venus Fly Trap (carnivorous plant), Vriesea (Bromeliad), Vitex (medicinal shrub), Vitaliana (alpine flower), and Viscaria (ornamental plant), showcasing varied botanical characteristics and uses in horticulture.

houseplants

Houseplants Starting With

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVW – X – YZ

Vaccinium

Vaccinium is a common and widespread genus of shrubs or dwarf shrubs in the heath family (Ericaceae). The fruits of many species are eaten by humans and some are of commercial importance, including the cranberry, blueberry, bilberry (whortleberry), lingonberry (cowberry), and huckleberry. The plant structure varies between species: some trail along the ground, some are dwarf shrubs, and some are larger shrubs perhaps 1 to 2 m (3 to 7 ft) tall.

Also, read the article 10 Plants That Look Like Rhubarb

Some tropical species are epiphytic. The fruit develops from an inferior ovary, and is a four- or five-parted berry; it is usually brightly colored, often being red or bluish with purple juice.

Vaccinium

Valerian

Valerian (Valeriana officinalis, Caprifoliaceae) is a perennial flowering plant native to Europe and Asia. In the summer when the mature plant may have a height of 1.5 metres (5 feet), it bears sweetly scented pink or white flowers that attract many fly species, especially hoverflies of the genus Eristalis.

The valerian root is used in many medicinal applications and is known to be an effective sleep aid. It can grow up to five feet tall, and when in bloom, the top of the plant is covered with small pale pink or white flowers. The plant is also known as “all-heal” due to its various medicinal properties.

Valerian

Variegated Indian Holly Fern

This is an evergreen fern with short, creeping rhizomes. The genus name comes from the Greek word Arachne meaning a spider, in reference to the spidery aspect of the clusters of spore capsules. The specific epithet from Latin means simple or unbranched. ‘Variegata’ is a variegated form that features glossy, lime green fronds with deeply divided subdivisions, showcased by a showy soft yellow stripe down the midrib of each pinnule (lance-shaped leaflet).

This plant remains erect well into the winter but is slow to begin new growth in spring. It grows best in part to full shade in moist, acidic, and well-drained soil.

Variegated Indian Holly Fern

Vanda Orchid

Vanda orchids are epiphytic, meaning they attach their roots to the surface of a nearby plant to obtain moisture and nutrients rather than growing in soil. They are known for their flat petals and long, meandering roots. They grow best in high humidity, high temperatures, bright light, and good airflow, which can be tricky to get right in the home.

This orchid also prefers consistent daytime temperatures between 70 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit and nighttime temperatures that hover between 60 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. They require a great deal of water. In periods of high temperatures, they might need to be watered twice a day. Water roughly once a week during winter dormancy. Keep the container’s medium consistently moist but not soggy during the growing season.

Vanda Orchid

Vanilla Bean Orchid

This plant is often known simply as “vanilla” because the seed pods from this plant are the source of natural vanilla flavoring used widely in desserts and beverages. While it’s a challenge to coax this plant into flowering and producing the seeds from which vanilla is harvested, the glossy green vine is an attractive plant on its own. Like many other types of orchids, the vanilla bean orchid is a tropical species that requires high temperatures and humidity to thrive.

In its native environment, this vining orchid is an epiphyte that lives on a host tree without drawing nutrients from it. The vine grows up to the treetops in a zigzag fashion, exhibiting long, succulent, lance-shaped leaves. Each blooming branch will bear one to two dozen creamy blooms for a total of several hundred flowers on a mature vine. Vanilla bean orchid is grown as a houseplant by serious enthusiasts who can handle its considerable demands.

Vanilla Bean Orchid

Venus Fly Trap

The Venus flytrap is a carnivorous plant native to subtropical wetlands of North Carolina and South Carolina on the East Coast of the United States. It catches its prey—chiefly insects and arachnids—with a trapping structure formed by the terminal portion of each of the plant’s leaves, which is triggered by tiny hairs (called “trigger hairs” or “sensitive hairs”) on their inner surfaces. When an insect or spider crawling along the leaves contacts a hair, the trap prepares to close, snapping shut only if another contact occurs within approximately twenty seconds of the first strike.

Triggers may occur within a tenth of a second of contact. The requirement of redundant triggering in this mechanism serves as a safeguard against wasting energy by trapping objects with no nutritional value, and the plant will only begin digestion after five more stimuli to ensure it has caught a live bug worthy of consumption.

Venus Fly Trap

Vriesea

Vriesea is a genus of flowering plants in the Bromeliaceae family. It’s native to South America and is known for its deep dark green foliage and beautiful orange or red blooming. The plant has broad flat leaves that arc out from the middle with lengths from 8-24 inches. Vriesea requires temperatures that oscillate between 64 and 75°F (18 to 24°C) and never drop below 57°F (13°C).

It requires light but not direct light. Regular but moderate watering is called for because Vriesea doesn’t usually require a lot of water. In spring and summer, keep the soil mix barely moist and check that water drains properly. Provide liquid leaf plant fertilizer more or less once a month to extend the blooming to the maximum.

Vriesea

Vitex

Vitex is a genus of flowering plants in the sage family Verbenaceae. It has about 250 species. Common names include chaste tree or chaste tree, traditionally referring to V. agnus-castus, but often applied to other species, as well. Chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus) is a deciduous shrub that bears clusters of purple flowers in the summer. Also known simply as vitex, the leaves of this plant are reminiscent of the marijuana plant (Cannabis sativa), with five leaflets in a palm-shaped arrangement.

The purple flower clusters (panicles) that bloom in midsummer look like those of the butterfly bush (Buddleja spp.). The black fruit contains four seeds that look like peppercorns and are sometimes used to flavor food. This is an easy-to-grow shrub that poses few challenges to a home gardener. If you avoid soil that is too wet or dense, success is nearly guaranteed.

Vitex

Vitaliana

Vitaliana is a species of plant in the primrose family, Primulaceae. It was previously known by the synonym Vitaliana primuliflora. Native to the high mountains of Europe, it is cultivated as an alpine garden plant, being considered easy to grow in well-drained soil in a sunny position. Vitaliana is a cushion- or mat-forming plant reaching up to 15 cm (6 in) or more across.

Its leaves are arranged in rosettes, each leaf being 5–10 mm (0.2–0.4 in) long and usually greyish green in color. The flowers are usually unstalked (sessile) and are bright yellow in color. They consist of a tube about 1–1.5 cm (0.4–0.6 in) or more long with five lobes reaching 1–2 cm (0.4–0.8 in) across when fully open. The flowers are borne singly at the ends of the leaf rosettes.

Vitaliana

Viscaria Plant

Viscaria vulgaris, also known as the sticky catchfly or clammy campion, is a flowering plant in the family Caryophyllaceae. It is an upright perennial growing to 60 cm (24 in) in height. The leaves are lanceolate. The flowers, which are 20 mm across and bright rosy-pink, appear in long whorled spikes from May to August.

It grows on cliffs and rocky places. In Central Europe, Viscaria vulgaris can be found in a variety of habitats, such as dry meadows, lush grasslands, stony slopes, rocky outcrops of hilly terrain, and open or sparse canopied forests. The Latin name Viscaria means “sticky”, and refers to the stickiness of the stem just below the leaf joints. Viscaria vulgaris is also grown as an ornamental garden plant.

Viscaria

About Christopher Evans

Hello, I'm Chris, the green-thumbed Founder of PotGardener.com. I'm passionate about bringing the beauty of nature indoors through houseplants and indoor gardening. Let's create healthier and more beautiful living spaces, one plant at a time!

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