How to Propagate Blushing Philodendron?

Blushing Philodendron Propagation in water

There’s something magical about houseplants – they not only enhance the aesthetics of our homes but also purify the air, offering a calm and peaceful environment. Among all, the Blushing Philodendron, with its vibrant pink foliage and lush growth, is a real eye-catcher.

But what if you could multiply this beauty? Well, with the right knowledge, you can. Propagation – the process of creating new plants from the parent plant, is not as complicated as you might think. Also, here is a detailed article on how to care for Blushing Philodendron

Blushing Philodendron Propagation Basics

Propagation MethodTime for PropagationWorking TimeTotal TimeDifficulty LevelMaterials Required
Cuttings in waterSpring or early Summer15 minutes4-6 weeksEasySharp shears, a jar of water, and a healthy parent plant
Cuttings in soilSpring or early Summer20 minutes6-8 weeksModerateSharp shears, a pot with drainage, potting soil, and a healthy parent plant
Air layeringAny time of the year30 minutes8-12 weeksAdvancedSharp shears, sphagnum moss, plastic wrap, a twist tie, and a healthy parent plant

Propagation Methods

Cuttings in Water

This is the simplest and most common method. Choose a healthy stem from the parent plant, preferably with a few leaves. Using sharp shears, make a cut below the node (the point where the leaf joins the stem). Place this cutting in a jar of water and keep it in a warm place with indirect sunlight. The roots should start to develop in 2-4 weeks. Once the roots are about 2 inches long, transfer the cutting to a pot with soil.

Blushing Philodendron Propagation in water

Materials Required: Sharp shears, a jar of water, and a healthy parent Blushing Philodendron plant.

Step-by-Step Instructions:

  1. Identify a healthy stem on your Blushing Philodendron plant, preferably with a few leaves.
  2. Using the sharp shears, make a cut below the node – this is where the leaf joins the stem.
  3. Place the cut stem into a jar filled with water. Ensure that the node is submerged but the leaves are not touching the water.
  4. Position the jar in a warm spot that receives indirect sunlight.
  5. Wait for roots to develop – this usually takes between 2 to 4 weeks.
  6. Once the roots are approximately 2 inches long, transfer the cutting into a pot filled with soil.

Cuttings in Soil

This method is similar to the water-cutting method, but instead of placing the cutting in water, you plant it directly into a pot with well-draining soil. Keep the soil moist but not soggy and place the pot in a warm area with indirect sunlight. It might take slightly longer for the roots to develop compared to the water-cutting method, but it’s equally effective.

blushing philodendron propagation in soil

Materials Required: Sharp shears, a pot with drainage holes, potting soil, and a healthy parent Blushing Philodendron plant.

Step-by-Step Instructions:

  1. Choose a healthy stem with a few leaves on your Blushing Philodendron.
  2. Make a clean cut below a node using sharp shears.
  3. Fill a pot with well-draining potting soil and make a hole in the center.
  4. Plant the cutting in the hole, ensuring the node is covered by the soil.
  5. Water the soil until it’s moist but not soggy.
  6. Place the pot in a warm area that receives indirect sunlight.
  7. Wait patiently for root development, which usually takes 6 to 8 weeks.

Air Layering

Air layering is a more advanced method but can be more successful, particularly for larger cuttings. In this method, you wound the stem of the parent plant, wrap it in moist sphagnum moss, and then cover it with plastic wrap. Once roots have formed inside the moss, you can cut the stem below the roots and plant it.

blushing philodendron propagation in air layering

Materials Required: Sharp shears, sphagnum moss, plastic wrap, a twist tie, and a healthy parent Blushing Philodendron plant.

Step-by-Step Instructions:

  1. Identify a healthy stem on your Blushing Philodendron.
  2. Make a small upward-slanting cut about one-third into the stem.
  3. Wet some sphagnum moss and wrap it around the cut.
  4. Cover the moss with plastic wrap and secure it with a twist tie or string.
  5. Keep the moss moist by occasionally unwrapping the plastic and spraying water.
  6. After roots have formed inside the moss (usually 8-12 weeks), cut the stem below the new root ball.
  7. Plant the cutting in a pot with well-draining soil.

Tips To Grow

Basic Level

Water Propagation

Water propagation is an ideal start for beginners, and it’s just as magical as it sounds. You’re essentially coaxing a cutting to grow roots in water. The sight of new roots emerging from a cutting is nothing short of a miracle.

To start, select a healthy stem of about 4-6 inches long with at least two or three leaves. Make a clean cut below a node – the point where a leaf attaches to the stem. Remove the lower leaves, ensuring that they won’t be submerged in water. Place the cutting in a glass jar filled with water, ensuring the node is submerged. Place the jar in a warm, well-lit place, but avoid direct sunlight. Within a few weeks, you should see roots developing.

Soil Propagation

Soil propagation is a natural progression from water propagation. It’s essentially the same process, but instead of water, you’ll plant the cutting directly into soil. This method encourages the plant to grow roots adapted to soil right from the start.

Choose a healthy stem cutting as before, and prepare a pot with well-draining soil. Make a hole about 2 inches deep, place the cutting ensuring the node is in contact with the soil, and gently firm the soil around the stem. Water lightly and place the pot in a warm, well-lit place. Regularly check the soil moisture, and in a few weeks, you’ll see new growth.

Advanced Level

Propagation by Division

Once you’ve mastered the basic techniques, you might want to try propagation by division. This method involves separating a mature Blushing Philodendron into two or more plants. This can be a little tricky, but with patience and care, you’ll be rewarded with new plants much faster.

To propagate by division, gently remove the plant from its pot and identify natural divisions in the root ball. Carefully separate these divisions, making sure each has a good amount of roots and foliage. Replant each division in a new pot with fresh, well-draining soil and water lightly.

Rhizome Propagation

Lastly, let’s delve into rhizome propagation. This method involves cutting a piece of the plant’s rhizome, which is a type of underground stem from which new shoots and roots grow. It’s a bit more advanced, but it’s a great way to propagate plants that have become too large or need rejuvenation.

Identify a section of the rhizome with a couple of nodes, and make a clean cut. Let the cut surface dry for a day to prevent rot, then plant the rhizome piece just below the soil surface. Water lightly and place the pot in a warm, well-lit place. In a few weeks, you should see new growth emerging from the nodes.

As with all things plant related, propagation requires patience, persistence, and a healthy dose of TLC. But the reward – seeing a new plant emerge from a cutting or a piece of rhiz.


FAQs About Blushing Philodendron Propagation

When is the best time to propagate my Blushing Philodendron?

Spring and summer are the ideal times for propagation. This is when the plant is in its active growth phase and can recover more quickly from the stress of propagation.

My Blushing Philodendron cutting in water hasn’t grown roots yet. What am I doing wrong?

Patience is key here! It may take several weeks for roots to appear. Make sure the plant cutting is in a warm place with indirect light. Also, change the water every week to prevent bacterial growth. If there’s no sign of roots after a month, it may be worth trying with a new cutting.

Can I propagate my Blushing Philodendron in water permanently?

While you can certainly keep a Blushing Philodendron in water indefinitely, it’s not ideal for the plant’s long-term health. The lack of nutrients in water can lead to slower growth and less vibrant foliage. It’s best to transition the plant to soil once roots have developed.

My Blushing Philodendron cutting in soil is wilting. What should I do?

Wilting can be caused by overwatering or under watering, so check the soil moisture first. If the soil is soggy, let it dry out before watering again. If it’s bone dry, give the plant a good drink. Also, make sure the plant is in a warm place with indirect light.

How often should I water my newly propagated Blushing Philodendron?

For a cutting in soil, water lightly whenever the top inch of soil feels dry. For a plant in water, change the water every week.

Can I use a rooting hormone for Blushing Philodendron propagation?

Yes, you can use a rooting hormone to speed up the rooting process, but it’s not necessary. Blushing Philodendron generally roots well without it.

About Christopher Evans

Hello, I'm Chris, the green-thumbed Founder of PotGardener.com. I'm passionate about bringing the beauty of nature indoors through houseplants and indoor gardening. Let's create healthier and more beautiful living spaces, one plant at a time!

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