10 Companion Plants for Queen of the Prairie

Sweet Pea

Marigolds help deter nematodes and other pests that can harm echinacea. Mint plants repel aphids and other insects when planted near echinacea. Yarrow attracts beneficial insects like hoverflies that prey on pests. Dill attracts beneficial insects and helps deter Japanese beetles from echinacea plants. Nasturtiums attract pests away from other plants with their colorful flowers. Calendula flowers confuse pests and attract pollinators. Like marigolds, zinnias help deter nematodes. Tall sunflowers protect echinacea from wind damage.

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Marigolds

Marigolds are an excellent companion plant choice for echinacea, also known as the queen of the prairie. As one of the top companion plants listed, marigolds help deter pests that can harm echinacea plants. Their strong scent works to confuse common insect pests like nematodes that may be drawn to echinacea. When planted amongst or surrounding the echinacea plants, the marigold scent masks the scent of the echinacea flowers from these harmful pests.

Not only do they provide this pest control benefit, but marigolds also add a splash of colorful blooms to the prairie garden landscape throughout the summer months. Their gold, orange, and yellow flowers stand out amongst the echinacea’s purple blooms. As a native annual, marigolds are heat and drought-tolerant like echinacea, making them a perfect pairing to thrive together in prairie gardens. Their companion planting provides pest protection while complementing the aesthetic of this prairie queen.

Marigolds

Mint

Mint is another excellent companion plant choice for echinacea plants. Like marigolds, mint helps repel common pests that can affect the queen of the prairie. Mint’s strong scent works to mask the scent of the echinacea from insects such as aphids. When mint is planted amongst or surrounding the echinacea plants, its aromatic leaves release a fragrance that camouflages the scent of the echinacea flowers. This helps confuse pests and keeps them from locating and damaging the echinacea.

Beyond pest control, mint also adds an attractive foliage element to the prairie garden with its green leaves. The soft texture of mint leaves provides a nice contrast when planted amongst the echinacea’s stiff, upright stems and foliage. As a hardy perennial herb, mint thrives in the same sunny, well-drained soil conditions as echinacea. Its companion planting enriches the prairie landscape while protecting the echinacea from harmful insects.

Mint

Yarrow

Yarrow is a great companion plant choice for echinacea that provides both pest control and visual appeal. Like mint and marigolds, yarrow helps attract beneficial insects like hoverflies to the prairie garden when planted amongst echinacea. Hoverflies are helpful for controlling pests that may affect the echinacea. Beyond attracting helpful insects, yarrow also works to repel deer when used as a border planting around echinacea.

Deer tend to avoid browsing on plants near yarrow due to its strong scent. With its lacy foliage and fluffy white or pink flower heads, yarrow also adds lovely texture and color to the prairie landscape. As a drought-tolerant perennial, yarrow thrives alongside echinacea in sunny garden beds. Its deep roots help pull nutrients to the surface that enrich the soil for the echinacea. Yarrow provides pest control, visual interest, and soil enrichment when a companion is planted with echinacea.

Yarrow

Dill

Dill makes an excellent companion plant for echinacea in the prairie garden. Like other listed companions, dill attracts beneficial insects that help control pests that may affect the echinacea. Specifically, dill attracts predatory insects such as wasps and hoverflies that eat harmful insects like Japanese beetles. When planted amongst the echinacea, dill lures these beetles away from the echinacea flowers with its own small yellow flowers. Beyond pest control, dill also adds an airy, soft texture to the garden with its lacy green foliage.

Its finely divided leaves provide an attractive, feathery contrast to the stiffer echinacea stems. As an annual herb, dill thrives during the warm summer months alongside echinacea. It reseeds itself each year, ensuring a continual source of pest control and visual appeal in the prairie garden. The fern-like quality of dill foliage also helps to suppress weeds growing at the base of echinacea plants.

Dill

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums make a wonderful companion for echinacea in prairie gardens. Like dill, nasturtiums attract predatory insects with their bright orange, red, and yellow flowers. This helps draw pests away from the echinacea blossoms. When planted amongst the echinacea, the vivid nasturtium blooms lure in beneficial insects like hoverflies that feed on potential echinacea pests. Beyond pest control, nasturtiums also enrich the soil with nitrogen.

As the nasturtiums grow, their leaves break down and release nitrogen back into the soil. This enhances the nutrient levels of the echinacea plants. Nasturtiums are also drought-tolerant annuals that thrive during the summer alongside echinacea. Their cheerful blooms provide a vibrant splash of color that complements the purple echinacea flowers. Nasturtiums offer pest control, soil enrichment, and visual interest as an excellent companion for echinacea.

Nasturtiums

Calendula

Calendula makes a wonderful companion planting for echinacea in prairie gardens. Like nasturtium, calendula attracts beneficial insects to the garden that help control potential pests to echinacea. Its cheerful orange and yellow blooms lure in pollinators and other predatory insects. When planted amongst the echinacea, the calendula flowers help confuse insect pests and keep them from damaging the echinacea. Beyond pest control, calendula also adds beautiful color to the prairie landscape throughout the summer months.

Its blooms provide a bright contrast to the purple echinacea flowers. As an annual herb, calendula is heat and drought-tolerant, thriving during the same growing conditions as echinacea. Calendula also offers an additional bonus – its petals are edible and can be added to salads, soups, and other dishes. Both an ornamental and edible flower, calendula makes an excellent companion planting that enriches the prairie garden.

Calendula

Zinnias

Zinnias make a cheerful companion planting for echinacea in prairie gardens. Similar to marigolds, zinnias help deter nematodes – a pest that can damage the roots of echinacea. When planted amongst the echinacea, zinnias release a scent from their colorful flowers that helps confuse nematodes and keeps them from infecting the echinacea. Zinnias also bloom prolifically throughout the summer months, providing a long season of vibrant color alongside the echinacea flowers. Their rounded blooms come in a variety of bright hues like red, orange, pink, and yellow.

As heat-loving annuals, zinnias thrive during the warm weather alongside echinacea. Beyond pest control, zinnias contribute to the visual appeal of the prairie landscape with their cheerful display. As a companion, zinnias help beautify the garden while protecting echinacea from nematodes through their natural pest-confusing abilities.

Zinnias

Sunflowers

Sunflowers make a great companion planting choice for echinacea in prairie gardens. As tall plants, sunflowers help protect shorter echinacea stems from strong winds that could damage them. When planted as a border around echinacea beds, sunflowers provide a physical barrier to disrupt wind currents. In addition to protection, sunflowers attract many beneficial insects like bees, butterflies, and birds to the garden. These insects in turn help pollinate both the sunflowers and echinacea.

As warm weather annuals, sunflowers thrive at the same time as echinacea during the summer months. Their cheerful yellow and brown blooms provide a striking focal point that complements the purple echinacea flowers. Beyond wind protection and pest control, sunflowers also add visual appeal and interest to prairie plantings with echinacea. Their stately presence creates an aesthetically pleasing companion pairing.

Sunflowers

Cosmos

Cosmos make a beautiful companion flower for echinacea in prairie gardens. With their delicate, feathery foliage and single-blooms that come in shades of pink, red, white, and purple, cosmos add lovely texture and color to the landscape. As annuals, cosmos bloom prolifically from summer into fall, providing a long season of floral display alongside the echinacea. Similar to zinnias, the cosmos attracts many pollinator insects like butterflies and bees.

These beneficial visitors help pollinate both the cosmos and echinacea, while also preying on potential pest insects that could bother the echinacea. As heat-loving plants, cosmos and echinacea thrive together in the warm prairie climate. The cosmos flowers also contribute to the visual appeal of the prairie planting, softening and complementing the echinacea blooms with their frilly petals. Their pest control and ornamental attributes make the cosmos an excellent companion choice.

Cosmos

Black-eyed Susans

Black-eyed Susans are a beautiful native prairie plant that serves as a wonderful companion to echinacea. As perennials, Black-eyed Susans return reliably each summer to provide a long season of golden yellow blooms. Their cheerful flowers bloom at the same time as echinacea, creating a lovely display of complementary colors. In addition to their visual appeal, Black-eyed Susans attract many pollinator insects including butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds.

These pollinators help both the Black-eyed Susans and echinacea thrive while also preying on potential pest insects. Black-eyed Susans also use allelopathy to suppress weeds from growing around their base. When planted amongst echinacea, their foliage helps keep the area weed-free so the echinacea can grow robustly. As heat and drought-tolerant native plants, Black-eyed Susans and echinacea pair beautifully together in prairie gardens.

Black-eyed Susans

About Christopher Evans

Hello, I'm Chris, the green-thumbed Founder of PotGardener.com. I'm passionate about bringing the beauty of nature indoors through houseplants and indoor gardening. Let's create healthier and more beautiful living spaces, one plant at a time!

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