Button Fern

Button Fern (1)

The world of houseplants is filled with a diverse array of beautiful and captivating species, but there is one that stands out for its unique charm and easy-going nature: the Button Fern (Pellaea rotundifolia). Also, here is a detailed article on how to propagate Button Fern

This attractive fern, with its distinctive button-like leaflets, adds a touch of elegance to any indoor space. In this article, we’ll explore the Button Fern’s origins, characteristics, and care requirements, drawing from years of experience and knowledge as professional houseplant experts. Also, here is a detailed article on how to care for Button Fern

Plant Overview:

AttributeDetails
Botanical NamePellaea rotundifolia
Common NameButton Fern
Plant TypeFern
Average Size12-18 inches tall and wide
Sunlight RequirementsBright, indirect light
Soil TypeWell-draining, loamy soil
Soil pH6.0 – 7.0 (slightly acidic to neutral)
Bloom TimeN/A (does not produce flowers)
Native RegionNew Zealand

Plant Description

The Button Fern is a small, evergreen fern that belongs to the Pellaea genus. It has a delicate appearance, with arching fronds that are covered in small, round, button-like leaflets.

These leaflets are a rich, deep green color, which contrasts beautifully against the wiry, dark brown stems. The Button Fern is naturally found in the shady, forested areas of New Zealand, where it thrives in the moist, well-draining soil.

One of the reasons this fern has become a popular houseplant is its compact growth habit.

Unlike some other fern species that can become quite large and unruly, the Button Fern typically grows to a manageable size of 12-18 inches in both height and width, making it an excellent choice for small spaces or as a tabletop plant.

Button Fern (4)

Caring for Your Button Fern

Light Requirements: Button Ferns prefer bright, indirect light. Avoid direct sunlight, as it can scorch the delicate foliage. A spot near a north or east-facing window is ideal. If you have limited natural light, the Button Fern can also be grown under artificial light, such as a fluorescent grow light.

Watering: The Button Fern enjoys consistent moisture but is not as finicky as some other fern species. Allow the top inch of soil to dry out slightly between waterings, and then water thoroughly until water drains out of the bottom of the pot. Be sure to empty the saucer to avoid letting the plant sit in standing water, as this can lead to root rot.

Soil: A well-draining, loamy soil is best for the Button Fern. A mix of equal parts peat moss, perlite, and potting soil works well. This will provide the necessary moisture retention while still allowing for proper drainage.

Humidity: As a native of humid forest environments, Button Ferns appreciate higher humidity levels. You can increase humidity around your fern by placing it on a tray filled with pebbles and water, regularly misting the foliage, or using a humidifier.

Fertilizing: Fertilize your Button Fern once a month during the growing season (spring and summer) with a balanced liquid houseplant fertilizer diluted to half strength. Avoid over-fertilizing, as this can cause the fronds to yellow and the leaflets to fall off.

Pruning and Repotting: Prune any dead or yellowing fronds as needed to maintain a tidy appearance. Button Ferns are slow growers, so repotting is typically only necessary every 2-3 years.

When repotting, choose a container with drainage holes that is only slightly larger than the current pot to prevent waterlogging.

Pest Control: Button Ferns are generally pest-resistant, but they can occasionally attract common houseplant pests such as aphids, spider mites, or mealybugs.

Inspect your fern regularly for signs of infestation and treat any issues with insecticidal soap or neem oil as needed.


Propagation

Propagating Button Ferns is relatively easy and can be done through division. In early spring or during repotting, gently separate the root ball into smaller sections, making sure each division has a healthy root system and several fronds.

Plant each division in a separate pot with fresh, well-draining soil and provide the same care as for an established Button Fern.

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Identification of Plant

The Button Fern is a small, evergreen fern with unique features that make it easily identifiable. Here are some key characteristics to help recognize this charming plant:

  • Fronds: The Button Fern has arching, wiry fronds that grow in a semi-erect, spreading habit. Fronds can reach up to 18 inches in length.
  • Leaflets: The most distinctive feature of this fern is its small, round, button-like leaflets. They are arranged in an alternating pattern along the fronds and have a deep green color.
  • Stems: The stems of the Button Fern are dark brown to black and slender, providing a striking contrast against the vibrant green leaflets.
  • Size: This compact fern typically grows to a height and width of 12-18 inches, making it suitable for small spaces or tabletop displays.
  • Flowers: The Button Fern does not produce flowers or bloom, as is the case with most fern species.
Button Fern

Types and Varieties

While Pellaea rotundifolia is the most well-known Button Fern, other species within the Pellaea genus share similar characteristics. Some noteworthy varieties include:

  • Pellaea falcata (Sickle Fern): This variety has sickle-shaped leaflets and thrives in rocky or well-draining soils. It is native to Australia and New Zealand.
  • Pellaea atropurpurea (Purple-stem Cliffbrake): This fern is known for its dark purple to black stems and blue-green, oval-shaped leaflets. It is native to North America and prefers limestone or other alkaline substrates.
  • Pellaea andromedifolia (Coffee Fern): This species has leathery, dark green, coffee bean-shaped leaflets and grows in the rocky soils of western North America.

Facts about the Button Fern

  • Natural habitat: Button Ferns are native to New Zealand, where they grow in moist, shady forests and rock crevices.
  • Air purification: Like many ferns, Button Ferns are known to be effective air purifiers, removing pollutants such as formaldehyde and benzene from indoor environments.
  • Resilience: Button Ferns can withstand short periods of drought, making them more forgiving than many other fern species in terms of watering.
  • Non-toxic: Button Ferns are considered non-toxic to pets, making them a safe choice for households with cats or dogs.
  • Ancient lineage: Ferns, including the Button Fern, are part of an ancient group of plants that date back over 360 million years, long before the appearance of flowering plants.

Tips to Grow This Plant

  • Choose the right spot: Ensure your Button Fern receives bright, indirect light. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight, as it can scorch the foliage. A spot near a north or east-facing window works well.
  • Water consistently: Button Ferns prefer consistent moisture but do not like to be overly wet. Allow the top inch of soil to dry out slightly between waterings, then water thoroughly.
  • Maintain proper humidity: Button Ferns thrive in higher humidity levels. Use a pebble tray, regular misting, or a humidifier to maintain adequate humidity around the plant.
  • Fertilize cautiously: Fertilize your Button Fern once a month during the growing season with a balanced liquid houseplant fertilizer diluted to half strength. Over-fertilizing can harm the plant.
  • Keep it clean: Wipe the leaflets with a damp cloth to remove dust and maintain optimal photosynthesis.

Major Problems

Button Fern (3)
  • Yellowing fronds: Over-watering or poor drainage can cause the fronds to yellow. Adjust your watering habits and ensure the pot has drainage holes.
  • Leaf drop: Low humidity, under-watering, or exposure to drafts can cause leaflets to fall off. Increase humidity, water consistently, and keep the fern away from drafts or air vents.
  • Pests: Button Ferns can occasionally attract pests like aphids, spider mites, or mealybugs. Inspect your plant regularly and treat any infestations with insecticidal soap or neem oil.

Care and Maintenance

  • Prune as needed: Trim away any dead or yellowing fronds to maintain a tidy appearance and encourage healthy growth.
  • Repot when necessary: Button Ferns are slow-growing and typically require repotting every 2-3 years. Choose a pot with drainage holes that is only slightly larger than the current pot.
  • Monitor the temperature: Button Ferns prefer temperatures between 60-75°F (16-24°C). Avoid exposing the plant to temperatures below 50°F (10°C), as it may cause stress or damage.
  • Rotate the plant: Rotate your Button Fern every few weeks to ensure even growth and exposure to light on all sides.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can Button Ferns be grown outdoors?

Yes, Button Ferns can be grown outdoors in USDA hardiness zones 9-11, where temperatures do not drop below 25°F (-4°C). They should be planted in a shaded or partially shaded location, ideally in a well-draining, loamy soil.

Are Button Ferns safe for pets?

Button Ferns are considered non-toxic to cats and dogs, making them a pet-friendly option for houseplants. However, it’s always best to prevent pets from chewing on houseplants to avoid any potential digestive upset.

Why are the leaflets on my Button Fern turning brown?

Brown leaflets can be a result of underwatering, low humidity, or exposure to direct sunlight. Ensure your Button Fern receives adequate water, increase humidity levels, and move it away from direct sunlight to remedy the issue.

Can Button Ferns grow in low light conditions?

While Button Ferns prefer bright, indirect light, they can tolerate lower light conditions. Growth may be slower, and the color of the foliage may become less vibrant, but the plant should still survive. However, avoid placing your Button Fern in complete darkness or very dimly lit areas.

How often should I repot my Button Fern?

Button Ferns are slow-growing and typically require repotting every 2-3 years. When repotting, choose a container with drainage holes that is only slightly larger than the current pot to prevent waterlogging.

How can I propagate my Button Fern?

Button Ferns can be propagated through division. During early spring or repotting, gently separate the root ball into smaller sections, making sure each division has healthy roots and fronds. Plant each division in a separate pot with fresh, well-draining soil and provide the same care as for an established Button Fern.

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Conclusion

The Button Fern (Pellaea rotundifolia) is a charming and low-maintenance addition to any houseplant collection. Its distinctive appearance and compact growth habit make it an ideal choice for small spaces or as a tabletop plant. By providing the proper care and growing conditions, your Button Fern will thrive for years to come, gracing your home with its elegant, button-like foliage.

About Christopher Evans

Hello, I'm Chris, the green-thumbed Founder of PotGardener.com. I'm passionate about bringing the beauty of nature indoors through houseplants and indoor gardening. Let's create healthier and more beautiful living spaces, one plant at a time!

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